Nothing is small, in fact…

Photo Credit: Chicago Man via Compfight cc

Photo Credit: Chicago Man via Compfight cc

I had just arrived in Chicago with one of my best friends, and we were running a half-marathon the next morning.  This was a big deal for us; it was her first half-marathon, and my first since having a baby.  We’d been training for months for this race.  We’d slowly built up our mileage, practiced different fueling strategies, debated carrying water versus water stops, and carefully pondered the placement of the porta-potties along the route.  We’d booked airplane tickets and hotel rooms.  Later that day, we would go to a crowded convention hall on Navy Pier to pick up our race numbers and timing chips.  From my pocket, I unfolded and re-read the pre-race email that detailed our transportation options for getting to the starting line, several miles south of our hotel.

To continue reading and find out what small thing turned out to be a very big thing for that race (and my outlook on life), please check out my guest post at Be, Mama, Be.  

Linking up with the Humpday Blog Hop

The Hump Day Blog Hop
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Sisters in Spirit: Thankfulness

Sisters in Spirit is a series of blog posts by a group of women who felt that a spiritual perspective was lacking from the steady stream of news and information that flowed through their daily lives. We each agreed to carve out a space on our blogs on a monthly basis for a spiritual conversation. This topic of this month’s post is thankfulness.

I have so much to be thankful for this year, but I’m feeling short on prose today, so I hope you’ll enjoy this Thanksgiving prayer in lieu of my usual ramblings.

thanksgiving prayer

Please continue this conversation by reading and commenting on other posts on this topic with my Sisters in Spirit:

Bianca is a Navy wife from the great state of Texas (where she coincidentally currently resides), and she and her husband welcomed their first child in the fall of 2012. She has a passion for serving others, asking hard questions and sharing The Gospel with both her words and actions. Bianca loves Jesus, her hubs & her son, authentic friendships, traveling, making lists of all kinds, and trying new recipes which she blogs about on BecomingBianca.com

Rhonda is an attorney and native of Missouri.  She is known for being overly-emotionally invested in her three, elderly dogs and dabbling in a ridiculous amount of hobbies, including sewing, music, and writing, while mastering none.  She was baptized in her late twenties and is amazed and grateful that Jesus continues to put up with her.  She blogs at bigsnafu.com.

Kelli is a United Methodist. She is a writer and public health advocate. An Arizona native, she recently returned home. Her dog, Willie Nelson Mandela, runs the show. She blogs at: www.africankelli.com

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Sisters in Spirit: Hospitality

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Sisters in Spirit is a series of blog posts by a group of women who felt that a spiritual perspective was lacking from the steady stream of news and information that flowed through their daily lives. We each agreed to carve out a space on our blogs on a monthly basis for a spiritual conversation. This topic of this month’s post is hospitality.

I haven’t talked about it too much here, but if you know me in real life or if we’re friends on facebook, you’ve likely heard me talking about Wesley Downtown, the new church service that my husband is starting in downtown Springfield.  It’s a second worship site for Wesley United Methodist, but instead of renting space in a school or a strip mall, we are holding the service in another church (the oldest Methodist church in our city) whose membership and attendance has declined as the demographics of the downtown area have changed and the its congregation has grown older.  Two weeks ago, that church voted for Wesley to “adopt” it — take over the building and all its assets — and Wesley votes on the adoption tomorrow.

Wesley is known for its hospitality to guests and members alike, and it’s something we’re really working to infuse into the character of the new service (and new site, hopefully!)  Wesley Downtown is open to everyone, but we are located near lots of college students and young professionals living in the downtown area.  There has been a well-documented exodus from the church of young people who still believe in God, but feel like the church is irrelevant, homophobic, judgmental, and too political.

One new church service in downtown Springfield Missouri isn’t going to change the tide of public opinion, but one of the ways that we’re trying to be welcoming to people who may be disillusioned with church is through hospitality.  Jesus set the example here — welcoming all those people that society shunned, like children, widows, and “notorious” sinners, as well as doing everything he could make sure that all who wanted to hear him message could do so, preaching from a boat so a larger crowd could hear, or feeding the crowd of people who had gathered to listen to him.

We’re doing our best to follow this example in our own human, flawed ways.  We’re serving coffee and playing music outside on the church steps before the service to welcome people in.  We’ve got volunteers at every door to help people find where they’re trying to go.  Something I’ve personally felt called to do is to start a New Moms group for those of us who are fumbling through the first year with a baby.  We’ve only met once so far, but I am excited about the friendships and community that is forming.

Hospitality can seem like a fluffy, unimportant part of faith compared to prayer, service, etc., but Jesus’ two great commandments were to love God and love your neighbor.  Hospitality is all about loving your neighbor and showing them the love of Christ.

I hope you continue this conversation by reading and commenting on other posts on this topic with my Sisters in Spirit:

Bianca is a Navy wife from the great state of Texas (where she coincidentally currently resides), and she and her husband welcomed their first child in the fall of 2012. She has a passion for serving others, asking hard questions and sharing The Gospel with both her words and actions. Bianca loves Jesus, her hubs & her son, authentic friendships, traveling, making lists of all kinds, and trying new recipes which she blogs about on BecomingBianca.com

Rhonda is an attorney and native of Missouri.  She is known for being overly-emotionally invested in her three, elderly dogs and dabbling in a ridiculous amount of hobbies, including sewing, music, and writing, while mastering none.  She was baptized in her late twenties and is amazed and grateful that Jesus continues to put up with her.  She blogs at bigsnafu.com.

Kelli is a United Methodist. She is a writer and public health advocate. An Arizona native, she recently returned home. Her dog, Willie Nelson Mandela, runs the show. She blogs at: www.africankelli.com

Linking up with Sacro Speco (Sacred Spaces) at All Manner of Inspiration.

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Sisters in Spirit: Finding a Sabbath

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Sisters in Spirit is a series of blog posts by a group of women who felt that a spiritual perspective was lacking from the steady stream of news and information that flowed through their daily lives. We each agreed to carve out a space on our blogs on a monthly basis for a spiritual conversation. This topic of this month’s post is observing the Sabbath or taking a day of rest.

When this month’s topic was suggested, I laughed out loud. I know taking time out of our busy lives to rest and spend time in worship and prayer is hard for everyone, but what does the sabbath look like for a pastor’s family? Let’s just say Sundays are not the most restful days for me.

On Sundays, my husband wakes up early and leaves for work by 7am, leaving me to (hopefully) sleep in a bit. I wake up when the kids wake up, and begin the most relaxing part of the day, turning on cartoons for my 3 yr old and nursing the baby. At some point I look at the clock and realize I need to get in the shower if we’re going to get to church on time. More cartoons! Hopefully the baby will happily watch the ceiling fan for a few minutes. I hop in the shower and begin the mad dash of getting myself and two kids ready for church by myself. Sometimes I even leave the house on time!

I drive across town for Sunday School at our church’s main campus, then load the kids up again and drive downtown to our church’s new service that we’re starting at a second site (my husband is the main pastor for that service so I need to be there). It’s a late service (11:30) geared towards college students and downtown dwellers so I pass some snacks to the backseat (and myself) to tide us over until lunch.

I get my older son settled into the nursery and I go back to the sanctuary in time for the service to start. I make the most of the first few songs since the baby inevitably gets fussy and needs to be fed by the time the sermon starts, so I make a quick exit. I don’t think I’ve actually heard a sermon since the baby was born, even though he’s been going to church since he was 2 weeks old. The service ends around 12:30, I’m starving, so I pack up the kids and head home to figure out what to eat for lunch.
My husband arrives home about the time we’ve finished eating and I corral the 3 yr old up for naptime while he eats lunch. By the time I’m done reading stories and singing lullabies, my husband has crashed for a nap of his own, leaving me to deal with a baby who is wide awake for the first time all day.

If I do manage to get everyone else asleep in the afternoon, I usually do some food prep for the upcoming week and get dinner started.

Whew! Are you still reading? I’m exhausted just writing that out! Clearly, I’m not getting much rest on the Lord’s day. I know some of this is just a reality of being a mom of young kids, but I wouldn’t be going to two different church sites or managing it all by myself if we didn’t have a pastor in the family.

I support my husband’s choice to become a pastor, even though it’s not the direction I expected my life to take when I married a software programmer 12 years ago. But it’s been a long and ongoing journey to accept the sacrifices that come with it — the evening meetings, mission trips, and weekend work responsibilities that keep him from spending as much time with me and our family as I would like. Ask me at the wrong moment, and I’m still not all that thrilled about it. But as I’ve talked with other pastors
spouses about it, I’m learning that just like we don’t get to celebrate Christmas Eve like everyone else because there are Christmas Eve services at 3, 5, 7, 9 and 11 pm, we have to find a way to make our own Sabbath even though it may not fall on Sunday or look the same as other peoples.

I’m still sorting out what a Sabbath means to me and to our family. In my ideal world, we would choose one evening a week for family time, no phones/laptops/TV/distractions, and have a meal together, maybe read a bible story or do a family devotion. (I’m really dreaming here — with a 3 yr old and an infant, this won’t be happening any time soon!)

I hope you continue this conversation by reading and commenting on other posts on this topic with my Sisters in Spirit:

Bianca is a Navy wife from the great state of Texas (where she coincidentally currently resides), and she and her husband welcomed their first child in the fall of 2012. She has a passion for serving others, asking hard questions and sharing The Gospel with both her words and actions. Bianca loves Jesus, her hubs & her son, authentic friendships, traveling, making lists of all kinds, and trying new recipes which she blogs about on BecomingBianca.com

Rhonda is an attorney and native of Missouri.  She is known for being overly-emotionally invested in her three, elderly dogs and dabbling in a ridiculous amount of hobbies, including sewing, music, and writing, while mastering none.  She was baptized in her late twenties and is amazed and grateful that Jesus continues to put up with her.  She blogs at bigsnafu.com.

Kelli is a United Methodist. She is a writer and public health advocate. An Arizona native, she recently returned home. Her dog, Willie Nelson Mandela, runs the show. She blogs at: www.africankelli.com

Linking up with Sacro Speco (Sacred Spaces) at All Manner of Inspiration and GraceLaced Mondays.

GraceLaced Mondays
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Sisters in Spirit: Choosing Joy

Growing my own tomatoes makes me happy!

Growing my own tomatoes makes me happy! But when you’re as terrible a gardener as I am, planting anything takes a leap of faith.

Sisters in Spirit is a series of blog posts by a group of women who felt that a spiritual perspective was lacking from the steady stream of news and information that flowed through their daily lives. We each agreed to carve out a space on our blogs on a monthly basis for a spiritual conversation. This topic of this month’s post is choosing a positive attitude as an act of faith.

I had a baby 5 weeks ago, so it might seem strange that I’m writing a post about choosing joy. After all, he’s my little bundle of joy! People often ask if I’m just SO happy or over the moon to have a new baby at home, and I am.

But having a newborn is a mixed bag. In addition to feeling happy, you’ve also got exhaustion, wild hormonal swings, guilt about going back to work, body image issues, stress about whether you’re doing _______ right (sleep, feeding, pumping, etc), and a changing family dynamic as everyone in the house figures out their role with this new addition to the family.

I’m not going to tell you that I just squash these feelings and choose to be happy instead. As a very wise friend once told me, feelings can’t be wrong. But my natural tendency is to throw myself a pity party and wallow in my bad feelings… pinning the blame on someone else if at all possible. In case you don’t suffer this particular form of narcissism, let me tell you: It’s not particularly productive. It might make me feel morally superior, but it definitely doesn’t make me feel any better. Then I read something like this verse, and realize what am ass I’m being:

Consider it pure joy, my brothers and sisters, whenever you face trials of many kinds, because you know that the testing of your faith produces perseverance. James 1:2-3 NIV.

If I’m feeling bad, or anxious, or guilty about something — facing a trial, or a test of faith, as the scripture phrases it — I think it’s important to acknowledge how I’m feeling, and understand why I’m feeling that way. Then, I do what I can to fix the problem, remembering that i can only control myself and my choices, not other people’s. But once I come to terms with whatever is bothering me, I usually need a bit of an attitude adjustment. That’s where choosing joy comes in.

I don’t do it because I want to slap a fake happy face over my problems, or pretend my life is a fairytale. Quite simply, when I choose to be happy, instead of pissy (my default mode), I am acknowledging that God is working on me through this difficult time. And that’s something to be glad about. I still have a long, long way to go, but I know that I am becoming a more patient, gentle, loving person each time I choose the path of joy and grace over the path of anger and self-righteousness.

I hope you continue this conversation by reading and commenting on other posts on this topic with my Sisters in Spirit, Kelli, Bianca and Rhonda.

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Sisters in Spirit: July

Photo Credit: "Anwaar via Compfight cc

Photo Credit: “Anwaar via Compfight cc

Sisters in Spirit is a series of blog posts by a group of women who felt that a spiritual perspective was lacking from the steady stream of news and information that flowed through their daily lives. We each agreed to carve out a space on our blogs on a monthly basis for a spiritual conversation. This topic of this month’s post is distractions from God.
I’ve written about this before, but it’s embarrassing and I’m hoping a bit of public accountability might kick my rear into action.  I’m distracted.  Distracted by important things in life, like family and work?  Sure.  We all have responsibilities in life.
But is that really my problem?  No..  I’m distracted by stupid things, like checking facebook or email as the first thing I do when I get up in the morning.  I’m sure people’s overnight status updates, or those sale emails from Ann Taylor Loft are really going to change my life today.  Yeah right.  But still, that’s how I choose to start my mornings about 80% of the time.
Why?  I have alternatives — I could go for an early morning walk, I could spend time in prayer or reading the Bible… heck, with the time I fritter away, I could sleep later!    What the heck is going on?  I can’t really explain it, but the one time I did spend some time in the Word this week, here’s what I came across:

For I have the desire to do what is good, but I cannot carry it out. For I do not do the good I want to do, but the evil I do not want to do—this I keep on doing.  Romans 7:18-19.

Yep, that sounds like someone I know!  So what the heck am I supposed to do about it?  Clearly, gritting my teeth and relying on willpower isn’t working.  Or, as Paul phrased it:

Although I want to do good, evil is right there with me. For in my inner being I delight in God’s law; but I see another law at work in me, waging war against the law of my mind and making me a prisoner of the law of sin at work within me. What a wretched man I am!  Romans 7: 21-24.

I know a lot of people reach this point and throw up their hands, and say – that’s it, I’m giving up facebook, or giving up technology, or something along those lines.  I know that is a useful exercise for a lot of people.  But I want to change my heart, not just engage in a stunt. I want to try to figure out what I behind my distraction rather than just giving it up cold turkey.  I’ve never been too good at that, anyway.  Simply punishing myself rather than replacing my bad habit with a good one is just mean.  Continuing with that same passage of scripture —

Therefore, there is now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus, because through Christ Jesus the law of the Spirit who gives life has set you free from the law of sin and death.  Romans 8:1-2.

What am I really doing when I spend my time scrolling through people’s inane facebook posts?  I’m looking for connection.  Sure, knowing that cute thing my high school friend’s kid said might make me momentarily feel more connected to her, but I think we all know that’s not a real relationship.  True connection — in my marriage, my family, my friendships and my faith — comes through investing time and energy in the person I want the relationship with.  Christ has made that investment in me, so isn’t shutting my laptop for a few minutes the least I can do for him?

No condemnation of what I’ve done in the past, just freedom to move forward, without distractions that take away from the truly important things in life.

I hope you continue this conversation by reading and commenting on other perspectives on this topics with my other Sisters in Spirit, Kelli, Bianca and Rhonda.

Kelli is a United Methodist. She is a writer and public health advocate. An Arizona native, she and her boyfriend recently moved to the woods of New Jersey. Their dog, Willie Nelson Mandela, runs the show. She blogs at: www.africankelli.com

Bianca is a Navy wife from the great state of Texas (where she coincidentally currently resides), and she and her husband welcomed their first child in the fall of 2012. She has a passion for serving others, asking hard questions and sharing The Gospel with both her words and actions. Bianca loves Jesus, her hubs & her son, authentic friendships, traveling, making lists of all kinds, and trying new recipes which she blogs about on BecomingBianca.com.

Rhonda is an attorney and native of Missouri. She is known for being overly-emotionally invested in her three, elderly dogs and dabbling in a ridiculous amount of hobbies, including sewing, music, and writing, while mastering none. She was baptized in her late twenties and is amazed and grateful that Jesus continues to put up with her. She blogs at bigsnafu.com.

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Sisters in Spirit: June

Sisters in Spirit is a series of blog posts by a group of women who felt that a spiritual perspective was lacking from the steady stream of news and information that flowed through their daily lives. We each agreed to carve out a space on our blogs on a monthly basis for a spiritual conversation. This topic of this month’s post is forgiveness.

Do you find it easy to forgive? For the most part, I do. I know that’s strange, but I consider it one of my spiritual gifts. Like other people have received the gift of writing, teaching, etc., I truly consider it a gift to be able to forgive others (or perhaps better stated — not take offense) without a huge amount of effort on my part.

That being said, there is one area of forgiveness where I struggle, and that is forgiving myself. I have particularly noticed this since becoming a parent — it is probably not news to anyone but me that this experience gives you a lot of opportunities to make mistakes.

Parenting a toddler has been a true test for me.  Once my crying, pooping, little blob of a baby morphed into a walking, talking ball of free will and erratic emotions, my role changed from caregiver to a teacher, nurturer, and disciplinarian (AKA “mean mom”).  I realize it’s  necessary for me to be Mean Mom now, so my child doesn’t turn into a selfish megalomaniac of an adult, but wow – it’s hard.

I never know when I’ve drawn the right line in the sand, or if my punishments “fit the crime,” so to speak.  But the absolute worst is when I lose my temper.  I am really not a hot-tempered person, but somehow a tiny little human can drive me into a white-hot rage.  I generally console myself with the thought that plopping your kid in his room while steam rolls out your ears will not land him in therapy, but I still dwell on it for hours afterwards and I get extremely frustrated with myself for not handling the situation better.

Luckily I’ve been reading a Psalm a day most days (part of the one-year bible reading plan, which I mostly try to keep up with) and it really has brought me some peace, which I guess is what forgiving yourself feels like.  I’m sure God is having a good chuckle about these poems written about great hardships like war, famine, and death giving me comfort in my epic struggle of wills against a 3 year old.  Here’s a little snippet from one I read recently that I really liked:

I cry out to the Lord;
I plead for the Lord’s mercy.
I pour out my complaints before him
and tell him all my troubles.
When I am overwhelmed,
you alone know the way I should turn.  Psalm 142:1-3

I hope you continue this conversation by reading and commenting on other perspectives on this topics with my other Sisters in Spirit, Kelli, Bianca and Rhonda.

Kelli is a United Methodist. She is a writer and public health advocate. An Arizona native, she and her boyfriend recently moved to the woods of New Jersey. Their dog, Willie Nelson Mandela, runs the show. She blogs at: www.africankelli.com

Bianca is a Navy wife from the great state of Texas (where she coincidentally currently resides), and she and her husband welcomed their first child in the fall of 2012. She has a passion for serving others, asking hard questions and sharing The Gospel with both her words and actions. Bianca loves Jesus, her hubs & her son, authentic friendships, traveling, making lists of all kinds, and trying new recipes which she blogs about on BecomingBianca.com.

Rhonda is an attorney and native of Missouri. She is known for being overly-emotionally invested in her three, elderly dogs and dabbling in a ridiculous amount of hobbies, including sewing, music, and writing, while mastering none. She was baptized in her late twenties and is amazed and grateful that Jesus continues to put up with her. She blogs at bigsnafu.com.

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Sisters in Spirit: May

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Sisters in Spirit is a series of blog posts by a group of women who felt that a spiritual perspective was lacking from the steady stream of news and information that flowed through their daily lives.  We each agreed to carve out a space on our blogs on a monthly basis for a spiritual conversation.  This topic of this month’s post is accountability
Oh, accountability.  It’s probably the driving factor behind this blog, honestly. Even though I know not that many people read it, there’s just something about putting your goals and aspirations out there for the world to read that motivate me to try to stay on track with whatever it is I’ve decided is important at the moment.
Of course, even with all the positive reinforcement, it’s hard to remember and actually follow through with all the goals I set.  (It could be that I set too many goals.  No comment on that.)  And these are things that are relatively insignificant in the grand scheme of life: give up coffee, plan a fun family outing, etc.  What about the stuff that’s really important to me, like being a better parent, wife, child of God?  Some of that is too personal for me to share here, but also, it’s really hard stuff.  Digging into what makes me tick and coming up disappointed in myself is not very fun.
Now, I firmly believe that I’m not going to earn God’s grace by checking off the boxes of things that a “good Christian” does: daily Bible reading, prayer, attending worship services, fasting, etc.  It doesn’t matter how hard I try, that’s just not how God works. But because I believe that Jesus already earned my way for me, it is important that I live out my faith and deepen my knowledge of God by doing some of those things.  Right now, I’ve committed to daily Bible reading/study with a group of women I (mostly) only know online.  I know it’s a little unconventional, but a quick daily scripture discussion with a group of 6-7 people is something that I would be unlikely to accomplish in real life.  I definitely don’t always succeed in getting my reading done, but I have read so much more of the Old Testament than I ever have before, and I’m really proud of myself for sticking with it even when I miss a few days.
It’s amazing what the encouragement of a good group of people, and the power of God can do. “Again, truly I tell you that if two of you on earth agree about anything they ask for, it will be done for them by my Father in heaven. 20 For where two or three gather in my name, there am I with them.”  Matthew 18:19, NIV.

I hope you continue this conversation by reading and commenting on other perspectives on this topics with my other Sisters in Spirit, Kelli and Bianca.

Kelli is a United Methodist. She is a writer and public health advocate. An Arizona native, she and her boyfriend recently moved to the woods of New Jersey. Their dog, Willie Nelson Mandela, runs the show.  She blogs at: www.africankelli.com

Bianca is a Navy wife from the great state of Texas (where she coincidentally currently resides), and she and her husband welcomed their first child in the fall of 2012. She has a passion for serving others, asking hard questions and sharing The Gospel with both her words and actions. Bianca loves Jesus, her hubs & her son, authentic friendships, traveling, making lists of all kinds, and trying new recipes which she blogs about on BecomingBianca.com.

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Sisters in Spirit: April

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Sisters in Spirit is a series of blog posts by a group of women who felt that a spiritual perspective was lacking from the steady stream of news and information that flowed through their daily lives.  We each agreed to carve out a space on our blogs on a monthly basis for a spiritual conversation.  This topic of this month’s post is calling
 
Last week, I attended the amazing Q Conference in Los Angeles.  I jokingly describe it as “TED talks for church people.”  Here’s how the conference organizers describe it:
 
Our culture is in a desperate place. 34% of our youngest adults deny any interest in religion (Pew 2012). The Christian faith is losing ground as a credible option for the spiritually curious. For too long, the church has emphasized what’s wrong with culture. The Q Conference curates a forward-looking conversation that celebrates what’s right, imagines what’s possible and educates Christians on how they are meant to play a central role in God’s work to renew all things.
 
This year’s conference featured 2 1/2 days of speakers on topics as diverse as preventing sexual trafficking, liberating the North Korean people, the making of The Bible miniseries, and an analysis of influential speeches by Martin Luther King, Evita Peron, and Jesus.  A recurring theme from all of the speakers was their impressive sense of calling to be doing what they are doing. 
 
I guess it would be impossible to accomplish so much without a strong sense of purpose.  But what does that mean for me, a boring lawyer in the Midwest?  I strongly believe that some people are called to drop everything and change their lives to follow a calling, while others live out their calling right in the middle of what looks like normal life.  There are Biblical examples of both, and while it might make discerning my calling a little more difficult, I am thankful for the freedom that we have in Christ to carry out God’s plans for the world in all kinds of different ways, according to the gifts we’ve been given.

I’m not one of those people who has known what they wanted to do since they were a little kid.  Frankly, I’m jealous of those people.  I’ve always been interested in lots of things, and found it hard to nail down what I wanted to do.  (How else do you end up as an Anthropology major, I ask you?)  I read something recently about how your calling can shift throughout your lifetime, depending on your circumstances or season of life.

That really resonated with me — even if I’m not feeling a strong calling to go out and change the world, I have interests and talents that I can cultivate for building friendships and helping my neighbors, right where I am.  For me, in this moment, that looks like cultivating a gentle, patient and generous spirit for my family, and helping friends, co-workers, and you wonderful readers improve their own lives in a couple of areas that I really enjoy — fitness and cooking.  

I hope you continue this conversation by reading and commenting other perspectives on Christianity with my other Sisters in Spirit, Kelli and Bianca.

Kelli is a liberal, all-loving United Methodist. She is a novelist and a
public health advocate. She and her dog Willie Nelson Mandela can often be
found on the trails of the foothills in Colorado where they live. She dreams of
writing a series of books from the perspective of the women in the Bible. She blogs at: www.africankelli.com

Bianca is a Navy wife from the great state of Texas (where she coincidentally currently resides), and she and her husband welcomed their first child in the fall of 2012. She has a passion for serving others, asking hard questions and sharing The Gospel with both her words and actions. Bianca loves Jesus, her hubs & her son, authentic friendships, traveling, making lists of all kinds, and trying new recipes which she blogs about on BecomingBianca.com.

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Sisters in Spirit: March

Easter. It’s right around the corner, how could we not write about it this month?

I’m not up for a deep theological discussion today, so I’m just going to say that talking to little kids about Easter is hard.  Christmas?  Simple.  Baby Jesus, farm animals, etc.  God sent his son as a baby human to save the whole world — isn’t that great?  But Easter, man… Easter is tough.  Here’s the best I’ve been able to manage:

Baby Jesus grew up to be a man, and he was a teacher who told stories to help people understand God’s love.  He also helped a lot of people who were sick or injured get better.

But some people got really mad at Jesus, because they were in charge, and Jesus’ powers and stories made people realize that what the leaders had been teaching them was wrong, and that they should follow Jesus instead.

And… here’s where things get really dicey.

So the leaders had Jesus arrested for something he didn’t do, and he was killed.  His friends were really sad.  They buried him in a cave with a big rock in front.  Three days later, some of his friends came to the cave to make sure everything was okay, and the cave was open and Jesus was gone.

A little while later, they saw Jesus walking around, talking and eating.  He was alive!  Jesus told him that he died to save everyone in the world from all the bad things they have done, and help them understand how much God loves you.

So — how did I do?

Sisters in Spirit is a series of blog posts by a group of women who felt that a spiritual perspective was lacking from the steady stream of news and information that flowed through their daily lives. We each agreed to carve out a space on their blogs on a monthly basis for a spiritual conversation. I hope you continue this conversation by reading and commenting other perspectives on Christianity with my other Sisters in Spirit.

Kelli is a liberal, all-loving United Methodist. She is a novelist and a
public health advocate. She and her dog Willie Nelson Mandela can often be
found on the trails of the foothills in Colorado where they live. She dreams of
writing a series of books from the perspective of the women in the Bible. She blogs at: www.africankelli.com

Bianca is a Navy wife from the great state of Texas (where she coincidentally currently resides), and she and her husband welcomed their first child in the fall of 2012. She has a passion for serving others, asking hard questions and sharing The Gospel with both her words and actions. Bianca loves Jesus, her hubs & her son, authentic friendships, traveling, making lists of all kinds, and trying new recipes which she blogs about on BecomingBianca.com.

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